Unit Overview:

         How can people reduce negative impact on the environment? What methods help us sustain and even improve the environment? What factors harm our environment and what can we do about them? The design process throughout this unit examines human environmental impacts, assessing the kinds of solutions that are feasible, and designing and evaluating solutions that could reduce that impact. Student teams will investigate minimizing the impact of humans on water usage, land usage, and/or pollution in the environment. They will explore school impact on energy use, self-monitor and report use of electricity, water, and recycling, calculate the Carbon footprint of every student at their school and create a school plan to minimize that impact. In the final Design Challenge students will choose a problem to monitor/study, present the problem with data, and then design a solution and monitor the results. This unit gives students insights into how they can make positive environmental improvements for their future.

Educational Outcomes:

  • Given a problem related to human impact on the environment, students use scientific information and principles to generate a design solution that:
    • Addresses the results of the particular human activity.
    • Incorporates technologies that can be used to monitor and minimize negative effects that human activities have on the environment.
    • Identify relationships between the human activity and the negative environmental impact based on scientific principles, and distinguish between causal and correlational relationships to facilitate the design of the solution.
  • Students define and quantify, when appropriate, criteria and constraints for the solution, including:
    • Individual or societal needs and desires.
    • Constraints imposed by economic conditions (e.g., costs of building and maintaining the solution).
  • Students evaluate potential solutions:
    • Students describe how well the solution meets the criteria and constraints, including monitoring or minimizing a human impact based on the causal relationships between relevant scientific principles about the processes that occur in, as well as among, Earth systems and the human impact on the environment.
    • Students identify limitations of the use of technologies employed by the solution.

 

STEAM Integration:

In the Empathy phase of Lesson 1 students are presented with and discuss their school’s energy report. The Define phase of Lesson 2 requires students to monitor/ self-report on one of three usage areas: electricity, water, or trash usage. In the Define phase of Lesson 3 students use a carbon footprint calculator to find their own carbon footprint, and use an algorithm to multiply across the carbon footprint of all students at their school, and result in creating a school plan to minimize impact. The final Design Challenge (Ideate, Prototype, and Test phases) of Lesson 4 asks students to choose a problem to monitor and explore, to present the problem with data, and to take that information to design a solution and monitor the results.

 


STEAM INTEGRATION

Use the language of the standards to describe each lesson and the design challenge. Include abbreviation for standard in parenthesis (ie- 5.MD.C.3) Remember to include standards that may be represented in more than one lesson.

Click on the “+” icon to open each section

Unit Materials

List all materials needed for the entire unit. Link Makerspace-in-a-Box kit. List any substitutions, apps, software, measuring tools, classroom tools, etc.

Maker Journal Pages

Include a link to every pdf student page in the unit. (Media Library)

Lesson 1 Maker Journal Page

Lesson 2 Maker Journal Page

etc.

Design Thinking Overview

Our design thinking units have five phases based on the d.school’s model. Each phase can be repeated to allow students to re-work and iterate while developing deeper understanding of the core concepts. These are the five phases of the design thinking model:

EMPATHIZE: Work to fully understand the experience of the user for whom you are designing.  Do this through observation, interaction, and immersing yourself in their experiences.

DEFINE: Process and synthesize the findings from your empathy work in order to form a user point of view that you will address with your design.

IDEATE: Explore a wide variety of possible solutions through generating a large quantity of diverse possible solutions, allowing you to step beyond the obvious and explore a range of ideas.

PROTOTYPE: Transform your ideas into a physical form so that you can experience and interact with them and, in the process, learn and develop more empathy.

TEST: Try out high-resolution products and use observations and feedback to refine prototypes, learn more about the user, and refine your original point of view.

The Design Thinking Process | ReDesigning Theater. (n.d.). Retrieved April 2, 2016, from http://dschool.stanford.edu/redesigningtheater/the-design-thinking-process/

STEAM Integrated Standards

List standards used to create the unit. Link to exact standard.

 

Suggestions for pacing and differentiation

Suggest lessons that could be dropped or suggestions for 40 minute stand alone versions of lessons, etc.

Lesson Overview

Brief description of the lesson and standards addressed (by abbreviation). Describe specific aspects of standard that are being addressed if not all aspects are addressed in the lesson.

 

Essential Questions:

  • Bullet list of guiding questions teachers should use when coaching students in the content.
  • Question #2

 

LESSON PROCEDURE:

Any teacher directions not given in the sidebar go here before Student Directions

Student Directions (Click + to open)

Sample teacher and student dialog. Include reference to Maker Journal page and button to link to student maker journal page.

T: Sample Dialog

S: Sample Dialog

T: Sample Dialog

S: Sample Dialog

 


Concept Quick Reference (Click + to open)

very basic overview of the fundamental concepts. Summarize important formulas, scientific phenomena, vocabulary, etc.

Lesson Materials

Building Materials

  • list

Connecting Materials

  • list

Tech

  • list

Other

External Resources

[VIDEO] [TITLE of Video] [link to video- new window]
[PDF] [TITLE of PDF DOCUMENT] [link to PDF- new window]

Maker Journal Pages

dl-student

Teacher Notes

anything not covered in “active classroom” section. Any additional teacher directions or setup not included in the Lesson Procedure section. ex:
Consider selecting a few images of uses of water, drought, and results of the water crisis. Model good techniques for safe quality internet searches. Consider pre-selecting sites that yield quality information for this topic.

Active Classroom

(OPTIONAL If students should be allowed to be out of their seat, talking & collaborating, work in the makerspace)

Nudge responsibility and freedom for students. Tips for classroom management. (See Management in the active classroom book for suggestions)

 

EXAMPLE:

Tips for success in an active classroom environment:

Communication is critical in the design process. Students need to be allowed to talk, stand, and move around to acquire materials. Help students become successful and care for the success of others by asking them to predict problems that might arise in the active environment and ask them to suggest strategies for their own behavior that will ensure a positive working environment for all students and teachers.

Practice and predict clean-up strategies before beginning the activity. Ask students to offer suggestions for ensuring that they will leave a clean and useable space for the next activity. Students may enjoy creating very specific clean-up roles. Once these are established, the same student-owned strategies can be used every time hands-on learning occurs.

Learning Targets

“Unpacked” components of the standard. (bullet format)
  • Students will be able to conduct a short research project that use several sources to build knowledge about the need for and problems with freshwater transportation
  • Students will use this understanding to design more effective models of freshwater transportation

Assessment

Student Self Assessment

Student groups review their makerspace journal and summarize their learning in a group discussion

Peer Assessment

Student groups discuss and compare their findings and share different critical uses for water and methods of freshwater transportation that they discover in their research. Students should also share the difficulties that they discovered in transporting freshwater.

Teacher Assessment

Review student makerspace journal pages for formative assessment and discuss with individual groups as they work.

Conduct a whole group discussion to allow all students to share, discuss and compare their findings around different critical uses for water and methods of freshwater transportation that they discovered in their research. Students should also share about the difficulties in transporting freshwater.

Lesson Overview

Brief description of the lesson and standards addressed (by abbreviation). Describe specific aspects of standard that are being addressed if not all aspects are addressed in the lesson.

 

Essential Questions:

Bullet list of guiding questions teachers should use when coaching students in the content.

 

LESSON PROCEDURE:

Any teacher directions not given in the sidebar go here before Student Directions

Student Directions (Click + to open)

Sample teacher and student dialog. Include reference to Maker Journal page and button to link to student maker journal page.

T:

S:

T:

 


Concept Quick Reference (Click + to open)

very basic overview of the fundamental concepts. Summarize important formulas, scientific phenomena, vocabulary, etc.

Lesson Materials

Building Materials

  • list

Connecting Materials

  • list

Tech

  • list

Other

External Resources

TITLE of Video [link to video- new window]

Maker Journal Pages

dl-student

Teacher Notes

anything not covered in “active classroom” section. Any additional teacher directions or setup not included in the Lesson Procedure section. ex:
Consider selecting a few images of uses of water, drought, and results of the water crisis. Model good techniques for safe quality internet searches. Consider pre-selecting sites that yield quality information for this topic.

Active Classroom

(OPTIONAL If students should be allowed to be out of their seat, talking & collaborating, work in the makerspace)

Nudge responsibility and freedom for students. Tips for classroom management. (See Management in the active classroom book for suggestions)

 

EXAMPLE:

Tips for success in an active classroom environment:

Communication is critical in the design process. Students need to be allowed to talk, stand, and move around to acquire materials. Help students become successful and care for the success of others by asking them to predict problems that might arise in the active environment and ask them to suggest strategies for their own behavior that will ensure a positive working environment for all students and teachers.

Practice and predict clean-up strategies before beginning the activity. Ask students to offer suggestions for ensuring that they will leave a clean and useable space for the next activity. Students may enjoy creating very specific clean-up roles. Once these are established, the same student-owned strategies can be used every time hands-on learning occurs.

Learning Targets

“Unpacked” components of the standard. (bullet format)
  • Students will be able to conduct a short research project that use several sources to build knowledge about the need for and problems with freshwater transportation
  • Students will use this understanding to design more effective models of freshwater transportation

Assessment

Student Self Assessment

Student groups review their makerspace journal and summarize their learning in a group discussion

Peer Assessment

Student groups discuss and compare their findings and share different critical uses for water and methods of freshwater transportation that they discover in their research. Students should also share the difficulties that they discovered in transporting freshwater.

Teacher Assessment

Review student makerspace journal pages for formative assessment and discuss with individual groups as they work.

Conduct a whole group discussion to allow all students to share, discuss and compare their findings around different critical uses for water and methods of freshwater transportation that they discovered in their research. Students should also share about the difficulties in transporting freshwater.

Lesson Overview

Brief description of the lesson and standards addressed (by abbreviation). Describe specific aspects of standard that are being addressed if not all aspects are addressed in the lesson.

 

Essential Questions:

Bullet list of guiding questions teachers should use when coaching students in the content.

 

LESSON PROCEDURE:

Any teacher directions not given in the sidebar go here before Student Directions

Student Directions (Click + to open)

Sample teacher and student dialog. Include reference to Maker Journal page and button to link to student maker journal page.

T:

S:

T:

 


Concept Quick Reference (Click + to open)

very basic overview of the fundamental concepts. Summarize important formulas, scientific phenomena, vocabulary, etc.

Lesson Materials

Building Materials

  • list

Connecting Materials

  • list

Tech

  • list

Other

External Resources

TITLE of Video [link to video- new window]

Maker Journal Pages

dl-student

Teacher Notes

anything not covered in “active classroom” section. Any additional teacher directions or setup not included in the Lesson Procedure section. ex:
Consider selecting a few images of uses of water, drought, and results of the water crisis. Model good techniques for safe quality internet searches. Consider pre-selecting sites that yield quality information for this topic.

Active Classroom

(OPTIONAL If students should be allowed to be out of their seat, talking & collaborating, work in the makerspace)

Nudge responsibility and freedom for students. Tips for classroom management. (See Management in the active classroom book for suggestions)

 

EXAMPLE:

Tips for success in an active classroom environment:

Communication is critical in the design process. Students need to be allowed to talk, stand, and move around to acquire materials. Help students become successful and care for the success of others by asking them to predict problems that might arise in the active environment and ask them to suggest strategies for their own behavior that will ensure a positive working environment for all students and teachers.

Practice and predict clean-up strategies before beginning the activity. Ask students to offer suggestions for ensuring that they will leave a clean and useable space for the next activity. Students may enjoy creating very specific clean-up roles. Once these are established, the same student-owned strategies can be used every time hands-on learning occurs.

Learning Targets

“Unpacked” components of the standard. (bullet format)
  • Students will be able to conduct a short research project that use several sources to build knowledge about the need for and problems with freshwater transportation
  • Students will use this understanding to design more effective models of freshwater transportation

Assessment

Student Self Assessment

Student groups review their makerspace journal and summarize their learning in a group discussion

Peer Assessment

Student groups discuss and compare their findings and share different critical uses for water and methods of freshwater transportation that they discover in their research. Students should also share the difficulties that they discovered in transporting freshwater.

Teacher Assessment

Review student makerspace journal pages for formative assessment and discuss with individual groups as they work.

Conduct a whole group discussion to allow all students to share, discuss and compare their findings around different critical uses for water and methods of freshwater transportation that they discovered in their research. Students should also share about the difficulties in transporting freshwater.

Design Challenge Overview

Give an over view of the design challenge. Example: In the culminating project, each student ideates, prototypes, tests, reiterates, and finally creates a successful ___

Essential Questions:  

  • Guiding Question #1
  • Guiding Question #2

LESSON PROCEDURE

Introduce the Design Challenge (Click + to open)

Sample student & Teacher Dialog. Should generate excitement and connect with Empathy phase discoveries. Teacher needs to provide criteria and constraints or develop them with students here.

T:

S:

T:

S:

Criteria & Constraints

Review the criteria and constraints with students.  Engineers design things using some rules about how the designs must behave or work.  These rules are called criteria.  Engineers can run out of materials, money, time to build, or space in which to build something.  In other words there are limits on how something can be built.  These limits are called constraints.  The criteria and constraints for this challenge are below.

 

Criteria (design requirements) Constraints (design limitations)
  • Model spans minimum of 2 ft.
  • Model must be easily put together and taken apart
  • Model can continuously hold a designated load
  • Model is portable
  • Model must be built with materials provided
  • Model must be completed and tested in the given time
  • Model must include 8 different materials in addition to fasteners and/or adhesives
  • Model must not be secured to the ground or testing area in any way

 

Ideate
Give a brief description of student activity during this phase. (Keep in mind students may choose to or need to return to this phase as the iterate)

 

Prototype

Give a brief description of student activity during this phase. (Keep in mind students may choose to or need to return to this phase as the iterate)

 

Test your Design

Give a brief description of student activity during this phase. (Keep in mind students may choose to or need to return to this phase as the iterate) Include references to any rubrics, criteria and constraint checklists or Maker Journal Pages included in the assessement

 

 

Concept Quick Reference (Click + to open)

very basic overview of the fundamental concepts. Summarize important formulas, scientific phenomena, vocabulary, etc.

Design Challenge Materials

Building Materials

  • list

Connecting Materials

  • list

Tech

  • list

Other

External Resources

TITLE of Video [link to video- new window]

Maker Journal Pages

dl-student

Teacher Notes

anything not covered in “active classroom” section. Any additional teacher directions or setup not included in the Lesson Procedure section. ex:
Consider selecting a few images of uses of water, drought, and results of the water crisis. Model good techniques for safe quality internet searches. Consider pre-selecting sites that yield quality information for this topic.

Active Classroom

(OPTIONAL If students should be allowed to be out of their seat, talking & collaborating, work in the makerspace)

Nudge responsibility and freedom for students. Tips for classroom management. (See Management in the active classroom book for suggestions)

 

EXAMPLE:

Tips for success in an active classroom environment:

Communication is critical in the design process. Students need to be allowed to talk, stand, and move around to acquire materials. Help students become successful and care for the success of others by asking them to predict problems that might arise in the active environment and ask them to suggest strategies for their own behavior that will ensure a positive working environment for all students and teachers.

Practice and predict clean-up strategies before beginning the activity. Ask students to offer suggestions for ensuring that they will leave a clean and useable space for the next activity. Students may enjoy creating very specific clean-up roles. Once these are established, the same student-owned strategies can be used every time hands-on learning occurs.

Learning Targets

“Unpacked” components of the standard. (bullet format)
  • Students will be able to conduct a short research project that use several sources to build knowledge about the need for and problems with freshwater transportation
  • Students will use this understanding to design more effective models of freshwater transportation

Assessment

Student Self Assessment

Student groups review their makerspace journal and summarize their learning in a group discussion

Peer Assessment

Student groups discuss and compare their findings and share different critical uses for water and methods of freshwater transportation that they discover in their research. Students should also share the difficulties that they discovered in transporting freshwater.

Teacher Assessment

Review student makerspace journal pages for formative assessment and discuss with individual groups as they work.

Conduct a whole group discussion to allow all students to share, discuss and compare their findings around different critical uses for water and methods of freshwater transportation that they discovered in their research. Students should also share about the difficulties in transporting freshwater.